Latest news from our Titanic and Belfast day tour from Dublin

The Titanic Belfast day tour now includes all transfers from Dublin to Belfast, the tour departs Dublin at 0800 am with comfort stops on route. We arrive into Belfast and will visit the political murals on the Falls and Shankill roads, we will also visit the peace wall. Entrance into the Titanic experience in Belfast is included in the ticket price. We have guaranteed slots. Once you book with us there are no queues for our group, as we are fast tracked into the Titanic centre. You will be in the centre for approx. 2 hours, for our international visitors the Titanic centre has audio guides in all the major languages. There is a small charge which is paid to the center on your arrival. So far our Spanish and French guests traveling with us have indicated to us that the audio facilities are good and well worth paying the extra £1.50 sterling.

You will need to book this day tour well in advance online

Please note that we are traveling into Northern Ireland and you will need to have £ sterling as the pubs / shops etc will not accept € Euro (you can use your credit cards locally)

Once we are finished in the Titanic centre we will then travel into Belfast city centre and you will have free time (approx. 2 hours) to explore grab a pint or some lunch or maybe do a little retail therapy. Belfast is a vibrant modern city, with much to see and do. So dont delay book online now

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Visiting Belfasts Donegall Square

Donegall Sq. marks the northern boundary of the Golden Mile and the southern end of the pedestrian-only Cornmarket district. City hall, once a favorite target for IRA bombers, dominates Belfast’s old city center.

Why not visit Linen Hall Library or Belfast City Hall, on our Titanic Belfast day tours from Dublin. The most dramatic and impressive piece of architecture in Belfast is also its administrative and geographic center. Towering over the grassy square that serves as the locus of downtown Belfast, its green copper dome (173 ft. high) is visible from nearly any point in the city. Inside, a grand staircase ascends to the second floor, where portraits of the city’s Lord Mayors line the halls, moving down the wall each year as the latest portrait is hung. Stained glass and huge paintings depicting all aspects of Belfast industry highlight the impressive rotunda, while glass and marble shimmer in three elaborate reception rooms. The City Council’s oak-paneled chambers, used only once per month, are deceptively austere, considering the Council’s reputation for rowdy meetings (fists have been known to fly).

Directly in front of the main entrance, an enormous marble Queen Victoria stares down visitors with her trademark formidable grimace, while bronze figures representing Shipbuilding and Spinning kneel at her feet. A more sympathetic figure of womanhood stands on East grounds, commemorating the fate of the Titanic and her passengers. The interior is accessible only by guided tour. (tours M-F 11am, 2, 3pm, Sa 2 and 3pm. Tour times may vary; no tours on Bank and Public Holidays.

Other Sights. One of Belfast’s oldest establishments is the Linen Hall Library with the red hand of Ulster atop its street entrance. The devoted librarians have compiled a famous collection of over a quarter million items documenting the social and political history of Northern Ireland since 1966. (Enter via 52 Fountain St. Free tours available, but call ahead. Open M-F 9:30am-5:30pm, Sa 9:30am-1pm.) Nearby, the Victorian Scottish Provident Institution, built in 1902, displays a facade featuring panels dedicated to the four main professions of Belfast’s industrial history—shipbuilding, ropemaking, spinning, and printing. (Across the street from City Hall, on the corner of Donegall Sq. N. and East Bedford St)

Visit Worlds Largest Titanic exhibition plus Belfast on a day tour from Dublin

dublindaytours

Titanic Belfast day tours from DublinHistory of Belfast City Hall For many centuries, Belfast was a small settlement. Everything changed in 1613, when a Royal charter gave Belfast town status. It expanded rapidly, becoming an important port and manufacturing cent By the end of the 19th century, Belfast had outgrown its status as a town and was a major industrial powerhouse, known for its shipbuilding, rope making, engineering, tobacco and textile industries.

In 1888, Queen Victoria gave Belfast the title of city and it was generally agreed that a new city hall was needed to reflect this change in status.

Groups visiting Dublin are you interested in visiting the Worlds Largest Titanic exhibit plus plenty of free time to explore Belfast?

Building work Negotiations to acquire the one and a half acre White Linen Hall site, located in Donegall Square, began in 1896 and a price of £30,000 was agreed. Built by local firm…

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